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Historic Galleries and Exhibition

Historic Galleries and Exhibition
£13.75 (with Gift Aid) | Friends free | Under 18s free

Pre-booking for timed admission is essential

This ticket grants you access to:

Historic Galleries

Built to exhibit the work of leading Victorian artist George Frederic Watts, Watts Gallery first opened its doors to the public on 1 April 1904.

Upholding the artist's belief that art plays a major part 'in the world's wellbeing', today this Grade II* listed building continues to showcase the art of G F Watts. From his early work and social realist scenes to celebrated portraits and ambitious symbolic paintings, the Historic Galleries trace the evolution of his art over a prolific 70-year career.

Sculpture Gallery

The Sculpture Gallery was specifically built in 1907 to display G F Watts's sculpture collection. Today the Sculpture Gallery continues to exhibit a fascinating assortment of anatomical models, écorché and preparatory studies, including the monumental gesso models for Physical Energy and Alfred Lord Tennyson.

 

Art & Action: Making Change in Victorian Britain

17 November- 21 March

Can art change the future? In the nineteenth century, Victorian artists, viewers, and critics increasingly began to believed it could. Art & Action is the first exhibition to focus on the Victorian roots of art activism.

From the 1840's as issues of poverty, hunger, and disease all became increasingly urgent in industrial Britain, artists began to question how their work could benefit society. From major Academy oils to Arts & Crafts designs, Art & Action explores how artists sought not only to comment on social problems, but to use their art to actively help solve them.

Often working in conjunction with social movements, Victorian artists were at the frontline of reform efforts. Featuring key works by Sir Luke Fildes, William Morris and G F Watts, the exhibition explores how, in the Victorian era, art came to be recognised as a powerful tool that could enact social changem improve lives and ulitmately shape the future. 

 

 

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By adding just 10% of your admission price you can turn any eligible tickets into Donation Tickets with the same right of admission. If you're a UK taxpayer and able to consent to Gift Aid, we can also claim back tax on the total value of your donation under the government's Gift Aid scheme. Simply keep the Gift Aid option selected at the Check Out.

Donations such as this help us realise our belief in Art for All.

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Historic Galleries and Exhibition
£13.75 (with Gift Aid) | Friends free | Under 18s free

Pre-booking for timed admission is essential

This ticket grants you access to:

Historic Galleries

Built to exhibit the work of leading Victorian artist George Frederic Watts, Watts Gallery first opened its doors to the public on 1 April 1904.

Upholding the artist's belief that art plays a major part 'in the world's wellbeing', today this Grade II* listed building continues to showcase the art of G F Watts. From his early work and social realist scenes to celebrated portraits and ambitious symbolic paintings, the Historic Galleries trace the evolution of his art over a prolific 70-year career.

Sculpture Gallery

The Sculpture Gallery was specifically built in 1907 to display G F Watts's sculpture collection. Today the Sculpture Gallery continues to exhibit a fascinating assortment of anatomical models, écorché and preparatory studies, including the monumental gesso models for Physical Energy and Alfred Lord Tennyson.

 

Art & Action: Making Change in Victorian Britain

17 November- 21 March

Can art change the future? In the nineteenth century, Victorian artists, viewers, and critics increasingly began to believed it could. Art & Action is the first exhibition to focus on the Victorian roots of art activism.

From the 1840's as issues of poverty, hunger, and disease all became increasingly urgent in industrial Britain, artists began to question how their work could benefit society. From major Academy oils to Arts & Crafts designs, Art & Action explores how artists sought not only to comment on social problems, but to use their art to actively help solve them.

Often working in conjunction with social movements, Victorian artists were at the frontline of reform efforts. Featuring key works by Sir Luke Fildes, William Morris and G F Watts, the exhibition explores how, in the Victorian era, art came to be recognised as a powerful tool that could enact social changem improve lives and ulitmately shape the future. 

 

 

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